All posts by friendsoffice

Learn More About the Friends at FRIENDS 101

Event will be followed by a private viewing of Mia’s Andy Warhol prints in the  Herschel V. Jones Prints Study Room.

Andy Warhol; Publisher: Factory Additions, New York; Printer: Aetna Silkscreen Products, New York Color screen print GIFT OF N. BUD AND BEVERLY GROSSMAN
Andy Warhol; Publisher: Factory Additions, New York; Printer: Aetna Silkscreen Products, New York Color screen print GIFT OF N. BUD AND BEVERLY GROSSMAN

Would you like to know more about what the Friends do? Please join us for Friends 101, a conversation about the history, activities, and opportunities available through the Friends. Whether you’re new to the organization or have been around for a while, we’d love to see you there!
This popular event is free and will be held at 10AM on Wednesday, October 18 in the Friends Community Room.  Stay until the end for an exclusive opportunity to view prints by Andy Warhol.
To attend please call the Friends office at 612.870.3045.

Transportation Fund Provides Visits to Mia

Still making history with Friends help and generosity!
Celebrating 21 years since its inception, the Friends Transportation Fund continues to provide busing grants to Twin Cities schools in need. Started by a generous gift from the Roberta Mann Foundation, the Transportation Program has been expanded by the Friends of the Institute’s “Buy a Bus” program as well as by fund-a-need donations from Art in Bloom.
This past year, with the Friends support, we were able to provide 64 bus grants to underserved schools in the Twin Cities area. These grants are essential to these schools so that their students have the opportunity to tour Mia’s outstanding art collection and to be inspired by the wonder of art.
In addition to our school year program, we were able to provide 16 bus grants to various locations in the YMCA’s North District. Summer school children were able to tour Mia’s permanent collection and enjoy book tours.  Art Adventure guides and Docents generously donated and delivered 120 copies of A Single Shard by Linda Sue Park. We hope to expand the summer school grant program into the future.
To kick off this new school year, we partnered with Learning Innovations at Mia to identify and expand our reach in the community. Mia’s participation in the MN Field Trip Expo in August introduced our program to both public and private schools to generate awareness of Mia’s wonderful school programs. We are expecting lots of new applications this year!

Need a Great Gift? Buy A Bus

Unique gift giving opportunity brings schoolchildren to Mia.
Did you know that the Friends have brought more than 900 children to Mia through the “Buy a Bus” program?  By donating to our “Buy a Bus” program, the Friends are able to provide bus transportation to Mia from schools.
This special Friends program allows Friends to share their love of art with young people and also give a special gift to loved ones.  Would you like to honor your first-year college student or brand new high schooler?  “Buy a Bus” donations make a great holiday gift and it’s never too early to start planning!  A gift of $150 brings 45 school children to Mia and you’ll receive a small toy school bus to present to the recipient of your gift.
Long-time Friends member and past president Suzanne Payne shared a story about her recent “Buy a Bus” gift:
“Last Christmas I was the surprised recipient of a gift of sponsorship for two school buses to Mia.”  Suzanne had told husband Bill about the program and he followed up with this surprise.  Suzanne says, “Not only was it a wonderful gift for me, but because of the ripple effect, this gift became a memorable gift to each of the children on those two buses. I highly recommend your consideration of this unique and thoughtful gift for Friends gift-giving.”
For additional information contact Robin Keyworth, Development Relations Chair, at robinkeyworth1@gmail.com/ friendsdevelopment@artsmia.org or the Friends office at 612.870.3045.

Dangerous Liaisons in the Halls of Mia

How a tea set can reveal history.
By Susan Arndt, Mia docent
In an encyclopedic museum such as Mia we are always presented with objects that stand on their own merit beautifully. Although, when we have an opportunity to view them in relation to one another they can spring to life in new and meaningful ways. I had this experience last fall when I was researching The Tea Service for Twelve that was part of a tour several junior docents were putting together. What tripped my imagination was reading about 18th-century salon culture and then understanding a little more about the history of that stunning Sevres tea set.

Grand Salon from the Hôtel de la Bouëxière, c. 1735 GIFT OF THE GROVES FOUNDATION
Grand Salon from the Hôtel de la Bouëxière, c. 1735 GIFT OF THE GROVES FOUNDATION

To set the scene for the tea set let’s start with our Grand Salon from the Hotel de la Bouexiere, a gift of The Groves Foundation (Gallery 318). Originally this Salon was a formal reception space in the Hotel (mansion) of Jean Galliard de la Bouexiere. He was not a noble but a well to do member of the bourgeoisie, a former general who collected salt and wine taxes for the crown. This brings up an important note on salon culture, classes mingled. One of the most famous Salonnieres of the day was Madame Geoffrin an orphan who married well but was not a noble. Her talent was to organize groups that brought together academicians in both the sciences, the arts, and philosophies of the day, along with nobility for lively conversations and recitations. She maintained strict order and lived by the motto: to give and be forgiven. Participation was required. Enlightenment spread ideas!  If men ruled the world, woman ruled the salon. The right invitation to the right salon could mean a career boost for a man, and an education or apprenticeship for a young woman hoping to have her own salon one day. Madame Geoffrin served a dinner at 1PM, followed by a lively conversation that lasted through the entire afternoon.
Some salons were structured around the evening with conversation, music, and entertainments, such as cards, that would last until the candles ran out and were not replaced. The Salon de la Bouexiere, recently reinterpreted as part of the Living Rooms* initiative, demonstrates this late night activity along with twenty-four hours of changing light and sound. Step inside. Can you imagine attending the intellectual salon of Madame Geoffrin during the day and moving on to experience a salon of entertainment in the evening? To maintain stamina and keep the witty repartee flowing, stimulants such as tea, coffee, and chocolate would have been required and served in beautiful hand painted porcelain.
Cup from a tea service for twelve, 1807–08 Christophe-Ferdinand Caron; Manufacturer: Sèvres Porcelain Factory GIFT OF THE GROVES FOUNDATION FUND
Cup from a tea service for twelve, 1807–08 Christophe-Ferdinand Caron; Manufacturer: Sèvres Porcelain Factory GIFT OF THE GROVES FOUNDATION FUND

Mia’s Sevres Tea Service for Twelve (Atherton and Winifred Wolleager Bean, Gallery 310) hand painted by Christopher Caron with illustrations from the beloved fables of La Fontaine is an example of the finest workmanship. Used in a salon the fables would have served to spark conversation. But this is not just any tea set. It was a gift from Napoleon to Prince William of Prussia. In 1807 the treaties of Tilsit made between France, Russia, and Prussia brought an end to the war of the fourth coalition. The treaty offered the best terms to Russia as Napoleon needed to form a blockade against England. The little emperor and the czar were quite cordial to one another and Napoleon even gifted his Sevres Olympic dinner service (140 pieces) to the czar. Napoleon viewed Prussia’s involvement as foolish, reckless, and costly. To punish them he took half their land mass and saddled them with enormous debt to pay for the war. The king of Prussia attempted to have the debt reduced eventually sending his brother Prince William to negotiate with Napoleon. He was denied, but Napoleon sent him the lovely moralizing tea set as a diplomatic gesture. Did Prince William bring up the dinner service? The fables represented give us quite a view into Napoleon’s mindset.
There is the fable of The Fox and the Bust: A fox spies a bust of a man.  He walks around it observing all sides. In the end he sits down to pronounce, “Many great lords are empty heads.” On the sugar bowl there is the fable of The Rat and the Frog: A rat comes to a river it cannot cross. A frog sees the rat and suggests that if the rat binds one of it’s legs to one of the frog they will be able to cross together.  They swim out into the river where the frog begins to dive deep with the rat, attempting to drown it. The rat struggles against the frog and so they are observed by a Kite who picks them off for its own meal. The morale: Be careful of the alliances you make, deceit always falls back on the cheat.
Did Napoleon actually think that Prince William would use the tea set in his salon? In a culture that valued witty repartee this would have upped the game to contemptuous mockery. I’m a little surprised that the tea set survived. C’est la vie!
*Generous support for Living Rooms: The Periods Room Initiative provided by the National Endowment for the Arts and donors at the 2014 Mia Gala.

Friends Lecture Welcomes Mia Contemporary Art Curator

Dr. Gabriel Ritter to speak on “Portraying Communities: Aliza Nisenbaum and the Care of Representation”
On Thursday, October 12th, Dr. Gabriel Ritter will speak at the Minneapolis Institute of Art, as part of the Friends Lecture Series.

Gabriel Ritter, Curator of Contemporary Art; June 2016
Gabriel Ritter, Curator of Contemporary Art; June 2016

Ritter has been with the Minneapolis Institute of Art since May of 2016 but already has accomplished a great deal as the Curator and Head of Contemporary Art. He has organized an encyclopedic re-installation of the contemporary permanent collection galleries in collaboration with LA-based artist Dave Muller. The re-installation titled Now Where Were We?  has prompted conversations with visitors of all ages. The recently closed retrospective of famed filmmaker Guillermo del Toro’s “At Home with Monsters” drew enormous crowds largely due to Ritter’s close collaboration with del Toro. The summer of 2017 brought New York-based Aliza Nisenbaum as the artist-in-residence to Mia. Working under the guidance of Ritter, Nisenbaum created large-scale canvases representing individuals and community groups in the Mia neighborhood. Ritter, as a specialist in postwar and contemporary Japanese art, is currently working on the first United States museum survey of highly acclaimed Japanese artist Shinro Ohtake.
Ritter states, “it is my responsibility to expand the collection and the narrative of art history, to better reflect the diversity and inequity of the world in which we live.” He intends to “look beyond the western canon to non-western artists and foregrounding underrepresented artists—female artists, artists of color, and those who openly identify as LGBTQ-through acquisitions, exhibitions, and research.” Also, the Contemporary Art Department looks forward to further “cultivating a regional identity” placing focus on artists working and living in the Upper Midwest region.
From the University of California, Los Angeles, Ritter received his B.A. in Art History and Japanese, as well as his M.A. in Art History, and a Ph.D. in Art History. He has also completed a Japan Foundation Doctoral Fellowship at the National Museum of Modern Art in Tokyo. He comes to Mia from the Dallas Museum of Art where he was the Assistant Curator of Contemporary Art.
Free tickets are available for this lecture starting September 15th to Friends members through artsmia.org or 612.870.6323. Tickets are available September 17th for the general public. Overflow seating is available in the Wells Fargo Room.
Generous support for “Now Where Were We?” is provided by the Mary Ingebrad-Pohlad Charitable Foundation. 
 Guillermo del Toro’s At Home with Monsters:
This exhibition was organized by the Los Angeles County Museum of Art, Minneapolis Institute of Art, and Art Gallery of Ontario.
Major Sponsor:
msab-legacy
This activity is made possible by the voters of Minnesota through a Minnesota State Arts Board Operating Support grant, thanks to a legislative appropriation from the arts and cultural heritage fund.
Additional generous support provided by Eric and Celita Levinson.

Friends Lectures 2017-18 Schedule

Reminder: September 14, 2017, Dr. Thomas Marks on, “The Poet in the Museum.”
All lectures are held in the Pillsbury Auditorium and begin promptly at 11AM.
Friends members may reserve their tickets for the lectures and pre-lecture tours on the 15th of each month prior to the lecture.  The lectures may be reserved by the public on the 17th of each month prior to the lecture.  Please call the Mia ticket office to reserve at 612.870.6323.

Month and Date Speaker                         Affiliation
September  2017 14 Dr. Thomas Marks Apollo Magazine – Editor
October 2017 12 Gabriel Ritter Mia – Curator and Head of Contemporary Art
November 2017  9 Aaron Rio Mia – Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Curator of Japanese and Korean Art
December 2017 14 Larry Millett Architectural Historian
January 2018 11 Ghenete Zelleke Mia – James Ford Bell Curator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture
February 2018  8 Yasufumi Nakamori Mia – Curator and Head of the Department of Photography and New Media
March 2018  8 Robert Cozzolini Mia – Patrick and Aimee Butler Curator of Paintings
April 2018 12 Anna Felicity Friedman Tattoo Scholar and Historian
May 2018 10 Max Anderson New Cities Foundation, Executive Director

The September and May lectures are sponsored by the Mark and Mary Goff Fiterman Lecture Fund and presented by the Friends of the Institute and Mia.

Mia How-To: Lecture Tickets and Pre-Lecture Tours

Each month free tickets are available for lectures presented by the Friends of the Institute. For members of the Friends, tickets are available on the 15th of the month previous to the lecture and to the general public, tickets are available on the 17th of the month. Reserve your tickets at artsmia.org or by calling 612.870.6323.
Friends Only pre-lecture tours are also held throughout the season. You may request the pre-lecture tour when you register for the Dr. Thomas Marks Lecture of 
September 14, 2017. Your lecture ticket will indicate both lecture and tour attendance. The same procedure applies to all lectures and all pre-lecture tours.
Tours begin promptly at 10AM and you are asked to arrive early at Mia in the Third Avenue Lobby under the Chihuly Sun. Tour participants will receive reserved seating for the lecture at the end of the tour.
Please be courteous and call if you must cancel your tour as we anticipate waiting lists. You may cancel by calling 612.870.6323.

Friends Lectures begin September 14 with Thomas Marks on the Poet in the Museum

Lectures to educate, inform, and enlighten.  
Additional information and lecture titles will be available in the September Newsletter
The Friends Lecture Committee is pleased to announce the upcoming Lecture Series for the coming2017-2018 year.  All lectures are held in the Pillsbury Auditorium and begin promptly at 11AM. Friends members may reserve their tickets for the lectures on the 15th of each month prior to the lecture.  The lectures may be reserved by the public on the 17th of each month prior to the lecture.  Please call the Mia ticket office to reserve at 612.870.6323.

Date Speaker                         Affiliation
September 2017 14 Dr. Thomas Marks Apollo Magazine – Editor
October 2017 12 Gabriel Ritter Mia – Contemporary Art Curator
November 2017  9 Aaron Rio Mia – Andrew W. Mellon Assistant Curator of Japanese and Korean Art
December 2017 14 Larry Millett Architectural Historian
January 2018 11 Ghenete Zelleke Mia – James Ford Bell Curator of Decorative Arts and Sculpture
February 2018  8 Yasufumi Nakamori Mia – Curator and Head of the Department of Photography and New Media
March 2018  8 Robert Cozzolini Mia – Patrick and Aimee Butler Curator of Paintings
April 2018 12 Anna Felicity Friedman Tattoo Scholar and Historian
May 2018 10 Max Anderson New Cities Foundation, Executive Director

The September and May lectures are sponsored by Mark and Mary Goff Fiterman Lecture Fund,  and are presented by the Friends of the Institute and Mia. 

Dr. Thomas Marks to Speak at Fiterman Lecture: A Poet in the Museum

Dr. Thomas Marks
Dr. Thomas Marks

Join us on September 14, 2017, for the opening lecture of the 2017-2018 Friends Lecture Series, featuring Dr. Thomas Marks. This lecture is sponsored by the Mark and Mary Goff Fiterman Lecture Fund and is presented by the Friends and Mia.
Since 2013, Dr. Thomas Marks has been at the helm of Apollo as its editor. Any art aficionado will be aware of the art magazine Apollo, founded in 1925.  Apollo is recognized for its access to eminent art collectors, critical essays, and above all unprecedented reporting of prominent artists of our time.   Previous to this, Marks was the Deputy Editor at Apollo.
Mark’s education speaks highly of his ability to lead this historic publication. He holds degrees from Pembroke College, University of Cambridge with a Master of Studies in Romantic and Victorian Literature; and a DPhil on Victorian poetry and architecture from Magdalen College, Oxford.  His writings regarding art and literature have been published in Literary Supplement, Times, New Statesman, and The Telegraph. Dr. Marks currently teaches 19th and 20th century culture and literature at the University of Oxford.
While at Apollo, Marks has propelled the Apollo website into an influential forum for daily art comments, reviews and news. He has also established Apollo 40 Under 40, a publication acknowledging up and coming talented young artists.
Free tickets are available for this lecture starting August 15 to Friends members through artsmia.org or 612.870.6323. Tickets are available August 17 for the general public. Overflow seating is available in the Wells Fargo Room.