2020/2021 Friends Lecture Series

December Friends Lecture

December 10, 2020 11:00 am

THIS EVENT HAS PASSED

Zoom

Ticket Price: Free

The December lecture features architect Sam Olbekson

In the Anishinaabe language, there is no word for “architecture” or even “art” because they believe that art, beauty, function are not separate concepts but interwoven into daily life. In other words, everything is related.

Sam Olbekson is Principal of Native American Design at the national architectural firm Cunningham Group and founder of Full Circle Indigenous Planning. He has spent more than 20 years working with Native American clients on culturally significant planning and design. Sam brings the perspective of a member of the White Earth Nation of Ojibwe who grew up in Native communities. The Anishinaabe are a culturally related indigenous people and the Ojibwe are a specific Anishinaabe nation.

As a youth with a strong interest in art and social issues, Olbekson’s Native American mentor encouraged him to consider architecture, believing it may be a way to contribute to Native culture and community building. An Ojibwe language teacher gave him the Ojibwe phrase to describe his profession that translates to, “I draw the houses, the ones that will be built, for my work.”

Olbekson often reconciles dualities. For example, he was the lead architect for the $110 million casino and hotel in the Cherokee River Valley that will have a lasting impression of the region on millions of visitors for years to come. A typical casino with Native looking symbols doesn’t honor anything so Olbekson tried to find form and aesthetics in deeper cultural places. He connected the mountain landscape and sense of place with the excitement a casino is meant to evoke, while honoring the Cherokee culture. His goal is to help Native communities in their economic development projects to ensure design and planning is done in a culturally appropriate way. 

Olbekson has worked on many economic growth and community building projects. Among them is the decade-long ongoing development of the American Indian Cultural Corridor that has transformed a decaying neighborhood into a safe and vibrant cultural destination with Native housing, stores, eateries and art galleries. Take Migizi Communications, a 40-year-old nonprofit organization that nurtures the development of Native American youth and is full of the energy, hope and spirit of the community’s future. Olbekson was a graduate of the program himself. The organization recently purchased and renovated a small building after a long capital campaign. Olbekson “was honored to design the space as a pro bono effort to say thank you for the personal impact they had on me as a youth.” 

Unfortunately, a fire destroyed the building that was located a block from the 3rd Precinct police station during the protests and ensuing destruction over George Floyd’s death. It was a sad and devastating loss, but the community is determined to rebuild. 

As they and other businesses in the Twin Cities rebuild, what should be on the forefront as architects and designers reimagine their communities? How can buildings and neighborhoods be designed to encourage equity, celebrate cultural identity, honor diversity while challenging divisive structural systems? Perhaps the word “placemaker” fits here. A placemaker works on the creation of quality public spaces that contribute to the health and well-being of the community. This architect sees his role as placemaker with a vision for an equitable and just future.

Reserve your tickets online, or by calling 612-870-3000.

Save the date for January lecture

January 14, 2021 11:00 am

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Zoom

Ticket Price: Free

Kick-Off the New Year with a Friends Lecture! 

Dr. Katherine Luber, Executive Director of Mia, will present “Beyond Durer: Becoming a Museum Director,” introducing attendees to Albrecht Dürer, the artist who was the subject of her dissertation.  Tickets are available to Friends members on December 15, and to the general public on December 17. Reserve online, or by calling 612-870-3000. 

Friends Lecture Series

November 12, 2020 11:00 am

THIS EVENT HAS PASSED

Zoom

Ticket Price: Free

Threat and Response: Saving the World’s Manuscript Heritage from Imminent Danger

Father Columbia Stewart, Director of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library will give the Friends November Lecture. 

Violent extremism, sectarian conflict, and the relentless pressures of globalization are destroying the written sources of human civilization. Hear how the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) is responding to these threats. HMML is the only institution in the world exclusively dedicated to the photographic preservation and study of manuscripts, with a particular emphasis on manuscripts located in places where war, security, or economic conditions pose a threat. HMML is making a critical impact in these preservation efforts around the world, including the Middle East, Ethiopia, South Asia, and the former Soviet Union—all areas that are rich in ancient cultures, yet currently torn by political instability and lack of resources. 

Father Columba Stewart, a Benedictine monk and Executive Director of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library at St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota, will talk about his team’s work digitally preserving manuscripts of diverse world cultures and religions at risk of being destroyed by war, disaster, looting, and neglect. 

Since its founding in 1965, HMML has worked with libraries in more than 20 countries to photograph historic manuscripts in dozens of languages. Some of the original manuscripts were later destroyed, stolen, lost, or moved for safekeeping. The library now holds the largest online collection of manuscripts in the world and makes them available on the vHMML Reading Room, an online environment for manuscript studies.

Upon becoming Executive Director of HMML in 2003, Father Columba embarked upon extensive travels throughout the world to establish working relationships with communities possessing manuscript collections dating from the early medieval period to modern times. Since then, HMML has digitized manuscripts from some of the world’s most dangerous and inaccessible places. Father Columba and his team accomplish this by working with local leaders to photograph manuscripts, “to ensure that their deposits of wisdom, their libraries of handwritten texts, the voices of their past, can join the global conversations of the digital era.” Father Columba has said, “We don’t always know trouble is coming, but we have a history of being there just in time.  People can say it’s serendipity, but I believe in providence.”     

A graduate of Harvard, Yale and Oxford Universities, Father Columba has written extensively on his research of early Christian monasticism. In 1981, he joined the Benedictines, the order that built libraries in the Middle Ages, preserving and reproducing Bibles and other religious and philosophical texts by hand. He is the recipient of numerous awards, grants, and fellowships. Most recently, he was the first Minnesotan invited to give the 2019 Jefferson Lecture in the Humanities by the National Endowment for the Humanities, the highest honor the federal government bestows for distinguished intellectual achievement in the humanities.

 A Mark and Mary Goff Fiterman lecture.

  

Friends Lecture Series: Father Columba Stewart

November 12, 2020 11:00 am

THIS EVENT HAS PASSED

Zoom

Ticket Price: Free

Learn about the preservation work of ancient manuscripts around the world at risk of being destroyed by war, disaster, looting and neglect. 

Please join us for a fascinating lecture by Father Columba Stewart, Benedictine monk and Executive Director of the Hill Museum & Manuscript Library (HMML) at St. John’s University in Collegeville, Minnesota. Fr. Steward will talk about his team’s work digitally preserving ancient manuscripts of diverse world cultures and religions at risk of being destroyed by war, disaster, looting, and neglect. 

Since its founding in 1965, HMML has worked with libraries in more than 20 countries to photograph historic manuscripts in dozens of languages. Some of the original manuscripts were later destroyed, stolen, lost, or moved for safekeeping. The library now holds the largest on-line collection of manuscripts in the world and makes them available on vHMML Reading Room, an on-line environment for manuscript studies.

Upon becoming Executive Director of HMML in 2003, Father Columba embarked upon extensive travels throughout the Middle East, Africa, Eastern Europe, the Caucasus and India to establish working relationships with communities possessing manuscript collections dating from the early medieval period to modern times. Since then, HMML has digitized manuscripts from some of the world’s most dangerous and inaccessible places. Father Columba and his team accomplish this by working with local leaders to photograph manuscripts, “to ensure that their deposits of wisdom, their libraries of handwritten texts, the voices of their past, can join the global conversations of the digital era.”  

Tickets are available October 15 for Friends members and October 17 for the general public. Please visit https://ticket.artsmia.org/ or call 612-870-3000 to reserve.