Lectures

Friends Lecture: Transforming Spaces for Artists and Communities

KELLEY LINDQUIST & TIO AIKENS of ARTSPACE
December 8th, 2022
11:00 a.m.
Pillsbury Auditorium

Across the United States, artist communities have revitalized and brought joy to towns, neighborhoods and cities. Since the 1980s, Minneapolis-based Artspace, America’s leading nonprofit real estate developer for the arts, has played an important role in promoting these transformations.

Artspace develops real estate in communities that want and need creative spaces – spaces that can also lead to fundamental social changes. With 56 projects in 35 cities, 22 states and 1 tribal nation, Artspace has given “brick and mortar” support to creative people of many disciplines. And by preserving and repurposing old buildings for sustainable, affordable live/work space for artists and arts organizations, Artspace supports culturally distinct communities and nurtures creative districts. Artspace also combines the tools of real estate with an understanding of the creative sector to provide technical assistance, feasibility and market research, and coaching services to assist arts and cultural organizations with unique space initiatives through their program initiatives and consulting services.

At the heart of this national organization’s “movement” are Kelley Lindquist, President and Tio Aiken, Vice President of Communications.

Since joining Artspace in 1987, Kelley Lindquist has grown this small non-profit organization to one of national significance. For over four decades he has advanced Artspace’s leadership to be deeply inclusive. With help from a team that currently includes 85 employees, he has expanded the organization’s reach to Native American and Native Hawaiian communities, Puerto Rican and Dominican communities in New York City, African American communities in Baltimore, Memphis and New Orleans, a Mexican American community in Texas and rural communities across Minnesota, Colorado, and other states. Of special note, he helped establish The Cowles Center for Dance & the Performing Arts in Minneapolis which showcases at least 50% BIPOC artists each season. Kelley’s innovative contributions have seen him honored with multiple awards and distinctions.

In concert with Mr. Lindquist is Tionenji (Tio) Aiken. She joined Artspace Projects in 2016 and has recently become the Vice President of communications. Using unique multi-format storytelling, she highlights Artspace’s diverse residential communities and partnerships nationally. Her background includes work with the Rafala Green Fellowship program, where she worked at the intersection of arts, real estate, and community development and trained the next generation of POCI leaders; this important effort was funded by the Ford Foundation. Tio is also a practicing poet, and a graduate of the University of Minnesota.

We look forward to sharing their story with you at this upcoming Friends lecture on December 8th at the Pillsbury auditorium at Mia at 11:00 a.m. Come early for coffee, treats, and conversation. See you there!

November lecture tickets are hot! Save the date for our December lecture

Mia’s special exhibition, Botticelli and Renaissance Florence: Masterworks from the Uffizi, is now underway! With all the interest and excitement about this show, the Friend’s November 10 lecture sold out quickly. It will feature Carl Strehlke, Curator emeritus at the Philadelphia Museum of Art. Dr. Strehlke specializes in the Italian Renaissance and has written extensively on Botticelli, Fra Angelico, Masolino and Masaccio, and other Renaissance masters. In his lecture he will examine how the city of Florence, its art, literature, and people, shaped the art of Botticelli, and how Botticelli in turn created enduring imagery that shapes our view of Renaissance Florence. The lecture will be recorded and available to view at a later time.

For our December 8 lecture, we’re excited to welcome hometown innovators Kelly Lindquist and Tio Aiken. For over 35 years, Minneapolis-based Artspace Projects, Inc., has worked to bring life back to neglected properties nation-wide by transforming them into live/work spaces for low-income artists and their families. As president of Artspace, Kelley Lindquist has a passion for restoring national confidence in America’s creative communities. He works hand-in-hand with Vice President of Communications Tio Aiken to engage diverse residential communities in this mission.

Friends Members have early access to tickets on November 15, so plan to join us in December for what is sure to be an intriguing talk. Lectures start at 11:00 in the Pillsbury Auditorium, but plan to come anytime after 10:15 to enjoy coffee and light bites prior to taking your seat.

In Pursuit of Fashion

Join us at the Friends fall kick-off lecture with Sandy Schreier, Fashion Historian

11:00 Thursday, Sep 8, 2022
Pillsbury Auditorium, Mia
Friends fall luncheon to follow

Fashion as Art. Through determination and passion for the art of fashion, Sandy Schreier amassed one of the largest and finest private fashion collections. Visually arresting and historically significant, many pieces were the subject of the Metropolitan Museum of Art (MET) Costume Institute’s fall 2019 exhibition. This trove of 20th Century French and American couture and ready-to-wear clothing was collected not as a wardrobe, but in appreciation of this form of creative expression.

Before the lecture, Ms. Scheier will personally sign copies of her book which features the exhibition pieces and promised gifts from her collection to the MET Costume Institute.

Click here to purchase copies of the book, “In Pursuit of Fashion” and pick up your book prior to the lecture.

Friends members can get their tickets starting August 15 before the general public 2 days later.

 

Friends Lecture – Save the Date

Ticket Price: Free

September 8 Friends Lecture

Save the date for the Friends September 8 Lecture featuring American fashion historian, Sandy Schreier.  Ms. Schreier has been called ‘the worlds largest private collector of couture clothing.’  Her collection was the subject of an exhibition at the Metropolitan Museum of Art (MET) that ran from November 2019 to September 2020 called “In Pursuit of Fashion.”

Friends Members have early access to tickets so plan to join us in September for what is sure to be a delightful talk.

 

Friends Lecture

April 14, 2022 11:00 am

THIS EVENT HAS PASSED

Pillsbury Auditorium

Ticket Price: Free

Patrick Noon, retired Senior Curator of Paintings and Elizabeth MacMillan Chair of the Department of Paintings at Minneapolis Institute of Art

Please join us for our April Friends Lecture: “Artist in Bloom: Eugene Delacroix’s Still Life with Dahlias, Zinnias, Hollyhocks and Plums,” with Patrick Noon.

A familiar face in the corridors and galleries of Mia for 22 years, Patrick Noon was the senior curator of paintings. He joined the museum in 1997, retiring in early 2020. He previously served for 20 years on the curatorial staff at the Yale Center for British Art in New Haven and was the founding curator of its prints, drawings and rare books area.

Noon is a specialist in 18th- and 19th-century French and British art. His acquisitions brought considerable depth to the holdings at Mia with the addition of some 200 paintings, including the first he bought for the museum, “Pastoral Landscapes” by French artist Claude Lorraine, or “the Claude.” That turned out to be one of the most important “Old Masters” the museum has acquired in decades, and also one of the most expensive. 

Then there is the larger-than-life portrait of a nobleman reading in his garden, Nicolas Largilliere’s “Portrait of Charles-Leonor Aubry, Marquis de Castelnau” from 1701, one of Noon’s most recent purchases. A companion painting of the Marquis’ wife, “Portrait of Catherine Coustard,” is part of the Art Adventure program that brings children on field trips to the museum. Someone had separated the portraits in the mid-19th century but now they are ‘remarried’ and hang together at Mia.

Noon has published and lectured extensively on French and British art. His research resulted in prominent exhibitions including The English Miniature in collaboration with the Victoria and Albert Museum; Richard Parkes Bonington with the Musee du Petit Palais, Paris; Crossing the Channel: British and French Painting in the Age of Romanticism with Tate Britain and the Metropolitan Museum; and most recently Delacroix and the Rise of Modern Art with the National Gallery of London. Delacroix’s Influence: The Rise of Modern Art from Cézanne to van Gogh was shown at Mia in 2015 during the museum’s 100th birthday year.

The Friends of the Institute purchased Eugene Delacroix’s Still Life with Dahlias, Zinnias, Hollyhocks and Plums for Mia to commemorate the Friends 100-year anniversary this year. Noon will share the fascinating story behind this still life, which was in a private collection and never before in the public eye until coming to Mia.

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Friends Lecture: Seitu Jones

March 10, 2022 11:00 am

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Pillsbury Auditorium

Ticket Price: Free

Seitu Jones is a multi-disciplinary artist, and community organizer, known for his large-scale public artworks, and environmental designs.  He works both independently and in collaboration with other artists, and has created over 40 large-scale public works. He has created sets for multiple Twin Cities theaters. His art has been exhibited at Mia, the Walker Art Center, the American Folk Art museum in New York, and the Renwick Gallery in Washington, DC. 

Seitu was born in Minneapolis in 1951 and has degrees in environmental history and landscape design.  He is retired from the faculty of the Interdisciplinary Arts MFA program at Goddard College in Port Townsend, WA.

He is a 4th generation Minnesotan. His great grandfather, who was born into slavery, relocated to Minnesota in the 1870s, first settling in Red Wing, and then Rochester.  His grandparents lived in the Rondo area of St. Paul.

His father, aunts, and uncles were all creatives, and inspired Seitu.

Seitu finds inspiration in so many places. He uses the spirit of improvisation in his work, which is in the sphere of African and Afro-Atlantic traditions. Much of his art centers around placemaking, creating, and manipulating space, while working with the community to change and transform, temporarily, a space to create a sense of place. He is also influenced by music, and always wanted to be a musician. When he won a Sally Award he bought a bass violin, and took lessons at the Walker West Music Academy.

He digs deep into the role that plants play in our environment, and spends time hanging out with plants and nature. Another big part of his work is passing on information, knowledge, and culture to new artists coming up behind him. He is influenced by the Black Arts Movement, and its belief that artists have an obligation to leave their community “more beautiful than they found it”.

In 2013 he received a Joyce Award from the Joyce Foundation in Chicago, which allowed him to develop “Create”, a dinner for 2,000 people at a table one half mile long, that in part was organized to show Frogtown residents how the food system works.

In addition to all of the above, he has collaborated on a number of projects, with his wife, Soyini Guytonand with fellow St. Paul artist, Ta-coumba Aiken for the cities of Minneapolis and St. Paul.

Last but not least; Jones received the McKnight Distinguished Arts Award in 2017, which honors a Minnesota artist who has made a significant contribution to the states’ cultural life.  With his designs, his artistic vision has become an indelible part of Minnesota’s cultural landscape, according to Kate Wolford, president of the McKnight Foundation.

Seitu Jones has demonstrated what’s possible, when an artist with a hopeful vision and a generous spirit sets down deep roots in his community!

We look forward to seeing you all at his talk the next Friends lecture March 10th in Pillsbury auditorium at Mia at 11am.
You are in for a TREAT!
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Friends Lecture: Save the Date

SAVE THE DATE – April 14, 2022, 11:00AM

Join us for the Friends Lecture Series with Patrick Noon, retired Mia curator, and the fascinating story of the Delacroix!

Eugène Delacroix, (French, 1798–1863), Still Life with Dahlias, Zinnias, Hollyhocks and Plums, c. 1835, oil on canvas, Gift of funds from the Friends of the Institute in celebration of their 100th anniversary, with generous support from Nivin MacMillan, Mary Agnes and Al McQuinn, Sheila C. Morgan, Mary and Douglas Olson, Carol Burton Gray, Nikki and Ron Lewis, Lucy Crosby Mitchell, Linda and Phil Boelter, Pamela and Mark Friedland, Katie and Steve Remole, Elizabeth Short and Kirk Cozine, Samuel and Patricia McCullough, Lucille Amis, Carolyn and Tucker Dahl, Maria Eggemeyer, Martha Head, Heidi Ault and Gretchen Holland, Ed and Teresa Luterbach, Jane and Thomas Nelson, Suzanne C. and William B. Payne, Constance Sommers, Marilyn Sundberg, Marietta and Jot Turner, and gifts made in memory of Teresa Pfister, 2017.52

February Friends Lecture

February 10, 2022 11:00 am

THIS EVENT HAS PASSED

Pillsbury Auditorium

Ticket Price: Free

Join us on February 10 at 11am when the Friends Lecture series welcomes Star Tribune theater critic Rohan Preston.

Please note: In accordance with the current City of Minneapolis mandate, Mia now requires all visitors ages 5 and older to show proof of full Covid-19 vaccination. Mia also requires all visitors to wear a mask.

A Life of Imagination: How an Immigrant Kid Found His Passion — and Freedom — in the Arts

Photo credit: Thomas John Wallace

Star Tribune theater critic Rohan Preston grew up with parents, both Jamaican immigrants, who were so fearful of 1970s and ‘80s New York, they forbade their children to just go “hang out.” Their fear was that their children would literally be eaten up by the concrete jungle. But the youngsters could go to the Brooklyn Public Library at Grand Army Plaza, to various museums, and to live performances of music and theater, including Broadway. Preston overindulged, becoming a glutton for cultural knowledge and experience not just for aesthetic reasons but because paintings and books, music, opera and dance literally meant freedom, as his teenage mind perceived it. That experiential education gave him a foundation that he polished at Yale, where he studied English and critical theory, devising his own path to becoming both an appreciator and an arbiter of arts and culture.

Preston was born in Jamaica and grew up in Brooklyn, New York, where he attended an arts magnet high school. His fascination with the theater began in the 10th grade when he began writing plays and poetry. In college, in addition to his coursework, Preston wrote for a variety of student publications, which enabled him to develop a marketable skill. Following graduation, he and a friend moved to Chicago in the hope of launching careers as playwrights, but it was writing theater reviews that kept him afloat.  Freelance writing for the Chicago Tribune and as a stringer for The New York Times eventually led to full-time employment at the Tribune. He was recruited by the Minneapolis Star Tribune in 1998 to be the paper’s theater critic and has remained in the Twin Cities ever since.

Over his decades as a theater critic, Rohan Preston has interviewed a raft of luminary artists, including playwrights Arthur Miller, August Wilson, Edward Albee and Tony Kushner. He has the unique distinction of being an Emmy Award-winning critic, having led a Star Tribune team that won the coveted award for a documentary on the historic 2008 elections. Preston has twice served on the Pulitzer jury for drama. In addition to his journalistic pursuits, Preston continues to compose poetry, write plays and take photographs, and loves to till the soil at home with his wife, poet Angela Shannon, and, when they visit, their two adult daughters.

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Dr. Eike Schmidt Lecture on January 20

January 20, 2022 11:00 am

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Ticket Price: Free

Join us January 20 at 11am for a Friends Centennial Anniversary event when the Friends Lecture series welcomes renowned German art historian and former Mia curator for decorative arts, Dr. Eike Schmidt. 

Eike Schmidt’s extensive knowledge of art history is a treasure in its own right, but his passion for the past doesn’t prevent him from looking towards the future. He is currently working as the director of the Uffizi Galleries, located in Florence, Italy, as the first non-Italian director in the museum’s 250 year history. There he brings innovation and a modern approach to one of the oldest museums in the world. By rapidly expanding its online presence, Schmidt has brought the Uffizi into the digital realm by embracing social media platforms like Tiktok, Youtube and signing up for Facebook on day one of Italy’s Covid-19 lockdown.  

With an eye on Tuscany’s past, present and future, Dr. Schmidt’s latest project, Uffizi Diffusi, will extend the museum’s reach throughout the countryside by loaning art to smaller galleries. Schmidt believes it is important to tell the story of the renaissance where it happened: “Art can’t survive on big galleries alone. We need multiple exhibition spaces all over the region — especially in the places where the art itself was born.”  This project is mindful of the overcrowding issues faced in Florence and the lagging economies in the Tuscan countryside. “The Uffizi Diffusi will bring to light works of art that currently nobody can see in a calmer, more intimate setting.”

Schmidt brings a wealth of knowledge to the Uffizi from previously held positions at the J. Paul Getty Museum in California and the National Gallery of Art in Washington, D.C. Between 1994 and 2001 he worked at the German-funded Art History Institute in Florence, simultaneously curating shows along the way. 

During his time at Mia from 2009 to 2015 he served as director of the Department of Sculpture, Decorative Arts and Textiles, he planned and curated several exhibitions and created a sub-department of Jewish Art.  

Schmidt will be returning to Mia on January 20, bringing with him his passion for the past and unparalleled knowledge for this very special anniversary, don’t miss what surely will be a memorable event.

Please note that Dr. Eike Schmidt will be speaking on January 20 at 11am and joining the Friends for the Centennial Anniversary kick-off luncheon. There will be coffee served in the Rotunda prior to the lecture. ​​

In-person lecture tickets are no longer available. There will be no in-person overflow seating. We are happy to announce this lecture will be available to stream virtually. Streaming tickets will be available Wednesday, December 22 at 2 pm. 

This lecture is made possible by the generous support of the Mark and Mary Goff Fiterman Fund

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December Friends Lecture

December 9, 2021 11:00 am

THIS EVENT HAS PASSED

Zoom

Ticket Price: Free

Rose B. Simpson

Rose Simpson’s work is powerful, earthy, with an independent voice.  Born in 1983, she comes from the Santa Clara Pueblo in New Mexico, famous for ceramics the women have produced since the 6th century, C.E.  She is a mixed-media artist, whose work includes ceramics, sculpture, metals, fashion, performances, music, installation, writing, and custom cars.

Rose still lives and works in the pueblo where she was born. It is the center of her world, the center of the earth, and where she finds inspiration.  Her life and her work goals are to find the tools to use to heal the damages she has experienced as a human being in our postmodern and post-colonial era objectification.  These tools are sculptural works of art that have a healing function that she hopes will become useful for everyone.

She is the daughter of Roxanne Swentzell, a renowned sculptor, and metal artist, and Patrick Simpson a wood, and metal sculptor.  Rose received an MFA in ceramics from the Rhode Island School of Design, an MFA in creative nonfiction from the Institute of American Indian Arts, and while an artist in residence at the Denver Art Museum, she acquired a certificate in auto body in the New Mexico College automotive science program.  With that knowledge she customized a lowrider car, painted it in the black on black style of Maria Martinez, another well known pueblo artist, named it “Maria,” and installed it at the entrance to the Hearts of our People exhibit at Mia a few years ago.

It can be said that Rose Simpson’s work is ultimately about the human condition.  She is forced to grapple with cultural insensibility, but sees the fight against the racial determination of her work as a privileged engagement.  Some of the decisions she makes are intentional to deconstruct stereotypes around culture and gender.

Rose B. Simpson is an exciting, creative, expressive, skilled, thoughtful person who uses her art to express her thoughts, ideas, and feelings about the issues that are important to her and, she hopes, to everyone.

We have the privilege of seeing, and hearing her virtually December 9 at 11 am via Zoom. Please join us.

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